Tuesday, December 17, 2013

A/V Now Available > FREE Webinar > Creative Commons: Open Education, Open Access, and Librarians > January 22, 2014 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM EST


Creative Commons (CC) is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools. Its free, easy-to-use open copyright licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give public permission to share and use creative works — with conditions or copyright terms which the author specifies. Dr. Cable Green, Director of Global Learning at Creative Commons, will discuss how the Internet, increasingly affordable computing, open licensing, open access journals and open educational resources provide the foundation for a world in which a quality education can be a basic human right. He will also explore how to build effective teams for institution / system-wide OER projects in a way that both builds high quality OER and OA and takes your institutions through the cultural shift to open.

Source and Registration Link Available At:

[https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/119047186]

A/V Available At:

[http://vimeo.com/84804789]

Monday, December 16, 2013

Perspectives on Open and Distance Learning: Open Educational Resources: Innovation, Research and Practice

by Rory McGreal (Editor), Wanjira Kinuthia (Editor), Stewart Marshall (Editor), Tim McNamara (Editor)

Contributors: José Vladimir Burgos Aguilar, Laura Czerniewicz, Susan D’Antoni, Bakary Diallo, Stephen Downes, Robert Farrow, Norm Friesen, Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams, Asha Kanwar, Wanjira Kinuthia, Balasubramanian Kodhandaraman, Karel Kreijns, Andy Lane, Samantha Lee-Pan, Airong Luo, Wayne Mackintosh, Stewart Marshall, Patrick McAndrew, Rory McGreal, Tim McNamara, Maria Soledad Ramírez Montoya, Dick Ng’ambi, Michael Paskevicius, Demetrios G. Sampson, Robert Schuwer, Shihaam Shaikh, George Siemens, Sofoklis Sotiriou, Jim Taylor, Abdurrahman Umar, Frederik Van Acker, Hans van Buuren, Marjan Vermeulen, Catherine Wangeci Thuo (Kariuki), Clayton R. Wright, Tsuneo Yamada, Panagiotis Zervas

Publishers: COL, Athabasca University (May 2013)

Categories: Monographs

ISBN: 9781894975629

Format: PDF (Portable Document Format)/Acrobat Reader

Additional Information:Also available in epub format.

Order a physical copy

Download (5,732 KB)

Description

“Everyone has the right to education.”

UNESCO Paris Declaration on OER, 2012

“Educators worldwide are developing a vast pool of educational resources on the Internet, open and free for all to use. These educators are creating a world where each and every person on earth can access and contribute to the sum of all human knowledge. They are also planting the seeds of a new pedagogy where educators and learners create, shape and evolve knowledge together, deepening their skills and understanding as they go.”

Cape Town Declaration, 2007

Open Educational Resources (OER) – that is, teaching, learning and research materials that their owners make free to others to use, revise and share – offer a powerful means of expanding the reach and effectiveness of worldwide education. Those resources can be full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, streaming videos, software, and other materials and techniques used to promote and support universal access to knowledge.

This book, initiated by the UNESCO/COL Chair in OER, is one in a series of publications by the Commonwealth of Learning (COL) examining OER. It describes the movement in detail, providing readers with insight into OER’s significant benefits, its theory and practice, and its achievements and challenges. The 16 chapters, written by some of the leading international experts on the subject, are organised into four parts by theme:

  • OER in Academia – describes how OER are widening the international community of scholars, following MIT’s lead in sharing its resources and looking to the model set by the OpenCourseWare Consortium
  • OER in Practice – presents case studies and descriptions of OER initiatives underway on three continents
  • Diffusion of OER – discusses various approaches to releasing and “opening” content, from building communities of users that support lifelong learning to harnessing new mobile technologies that enhance OER access on the Internet
  • Producing, Sharing and Using OER – examines the pedagogical, organisational, personal and technical issues that producing organisations and institutions need to address in designing, sharing and using OER

Instructional designers, curriculum developers, educational technologists, teachers, researchers, students, others involved in creating, studying or using OER: all will find this timely resource informative and inspiring.

Source and Link to Full Text Available At

[http://www.col.org/resources/publications/Pages/detail.aspx?PID=446]

Thursday, November 28, 2013

FREE > MOOCs, Badges and OER: Online Conference 2013 Programme

Image of a hand on a computer mouse

December 3-5 2013

ALL TIMES >  GMT-0
> Tuesday 3rd December <

10:00 - 11:00  How to ruin a MOOC: Lessons from the (not ruined!) OLDS MOOC

Yishay Mor, Open University @YishayM

11:30 - 12:30  Using Open Badges to credential knowledge and skills in your organisation

Doug Belshaw, Mozilla Foundation @dajbelshaw @OpenBadges

13:30 - 14:30  Stories from UKOER and beyond

Alex Fenlon, Higher Education Academy @afenoer

15:00 - 16:00  Cyberfeminists talk back to MOOCs: Feminist Pedagogy, Learning and Distribution of Knowledge in the DOCC model

Radhika Gajjala and C.L. Cole, Bowling Green State University and University Illinois Urbana Champaign, USA

> Wednesday 4th December <

10:00 - 11:00  Lessons learned from the ACTOER

Anna Gruszczynska, Sheffield Hallam University @AKGruszczynska

11:30 - 12:30  Making Connections: Sharing the Experiences of the Open Badges in Scottish Education Group

Grainne Hamilton, Jisc RSC Scotland @grainnehamilton

13:30 - 14:30  Implementing an Open Badge strategy – practical considerations to ensure success

Dave Waller and Steve Sidaway, MyKnowledgeMap Ltd

15:00 - 16:00  Challenges with designing and implementing a Language Learning MOOC

Apostolos Koutropoulos, University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA @koutropoulos

> Thursday 5th December <

10:00 - 11:00  Open Badges: Using 'Lightweight' Rewards and Credentials to Increase Motivation and Participation

Ian Glover, Sheffield Hallam University @irglover

11:30 - 12:30  Open Educational Resources: Impact, Evidence and Narrative

Rob Farrow, Open University

13:30 - 14:30  Using Synchronous Online Platforms for Learning

Kathy Boyer and Theresa Beattie, Jisc RSC YH @KathyMBoyer

15:00 - 16:00  Open Education - Taking a student partnership approach to developing more accessible Open Educational resources and practice through the disciplines

Terry McAndrew, Advisor (Jisc TechDis) and Academic Lead (Higher Education Academy) @terrymc

Source and Registration and Presentation Abstracts Links Available At:

[http://www.jiscrsc.ac.uk/yh/online-conference-2013.aspx]

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Open Education Week > March 10-15 2014


Open Education is, at its core, about free and open sharing. Free, meaning no cost, and open, which refers to the use of legal tools (open licenses) that give everyone permission to reuse and modify educational resources.  Free and open sharing increases access to education and knowledge for anyone, anywhere, anytime.  It allows people to make changes to materials or to combine resources in new ways to build something new.  Open Education incorporates free and open learning communities, educational networks, teaching and learning materials, open textbooks, open data, open scholarship, open source educational tools and on and on. Open Education gives people access to knowledge, provides platforms for sharing, enables innovation, and connects communities of learners and educators around the world.

The idea of free and open sharing in education is not new.  In fact, sharing is probably the most basic characteristic of education: education is sharing knowledge, insights and information with others, upon which new knowledge, skills, ideas and understanding can be built.  Open Education seeks to scale up educational opportunities by taking advantage of the power of the internet, allowing rapid and essentially free dissemination, and enabling people around the world to access knowledge, connect and collaborate. Open is key; open allows not just access, but the ability to modify and use materials, information and networks so education can be personalized to individual users or woven together in new ways for diverse audiences, large and small.

[snip]

Source and Archive for Open Education Week 2013 Available At:

[http://www.openeducationweek.org/]

Education Freedom Day > Celebration of Open Educational Resources > January 18 2014

Education Freedom Day is a worldwide celebration of Open Educational Resources. Initiated by 2013 by the same organization behind Software Freedom Day it aims at educating the worldwide public about the benefits of using Free Software and Open Educational Resources in education. It also provides an international day to serve as a platform to raise awareness to existing projects and communities around the world as well a encourage participation in local free software and open educational resources initiatives. The non-profit organization Digital Freedom Foundation coordinates EFD at a global level, providing support, giveaways and a point of collaboration, but volunteer teams around the world organize the local EFD events to impact their own communities.

Education Freedom Day will be hosted annually starting ... Saturday, January 18th, 2014. Registration is now open and we will try to provide as much information as possible regarding OER projects worldwide. Of course there is a global map of all the events as we usually do for SFD, HFD and CFD and a wiki with all related resources.

Source and Links Available At:

[http://www.educationfreedomday.org/]


Monday, November 25, 2013

Solvonauts > The Open Search Engine


We’re about Open Education, Open Data, Open Source – basically trying to be as open as possible in as many ways as possible.

We’re working towards creating an open source open educational resource repository any one can install and run. The goal is that people anywhere can curate and maintain a list of open resources and then share them with the world, allowing different communities and organisations to be express how they want to use open content. We’ve aimed to take the spirit of openness in this sense, and try to extend it to everything we do.            

Source and Link Available At:

[http://solvonauts.org/]

Sunday, November 24, 2013

Webinar Recording and Slides: _The Role of the Librarian in an Open Access World_


SAGE-sponsored ACRL/Choice October 23 2013 > Webinar 

The program featured presentations by:

  • Charles Eckman, University Librarian and Dean of Library Services at Simon Fraser University
  • Dave Ross, Executive Publisher of OA at SAGE
  • Michael S. Mott,The University of Mississippi, Advanced Education Center

Thanks to Gary Price !

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Survey > Quality and Pedagogical Guidelines for Open Educational Resources (OER) Use in Higher Education


Dear OER Experts or University Educators,

The researchers are conducting an online survey to develop and validate a set of quality and pedagogical guidelines which individual educators in higher education can apply in selecting and utilizing freely available OER for their teaching. OER can be full courses, textbooks, course materials, video/audio lectures, tests, and any other materials or tools used to support teaching and learning.

We are asking for your help in validating the quality/pedagogical guidelines for OER by completing an online survey. This survey should take about 10 minutes.

This survey has 4 sections:

  • Section 1, Your Background, consists of 4 questions.
  • Section 2, Quality Standards, consists of rating the importance of the 18 Quality Standards.
  • Section 3, Pedagogical Guidelines, consists of rating the usefulness of the 10 Pedagogical Strategies.
  • Section 4, Additional Comments, consists of an optional opportunity to provide additional comments or suggestions. 
Your responses will be added together with other experts and educators involved in developing and/or using OER in selected universities in various regions . Your participation in this study is voluntary and you may stop at any time. Your participation in this survey will remain confidential.  The survey does not require any personal information that would identify who is making the responses.  While there are no foreseeable risks to you as a participant in this survey, your participation will contribute significantly to creating Quality Standards and Pedagogical Guidelines for OER useful for effective university teaching. We shall be pleased to share results of this survey with you upon request.

If you have any questions about the survey, please contact any of the researchers below.

If you’ve read our explanation above and agree to participate in this survey, please click the “Continue to Survey” button below.  If not, please exit this page.

Findings of the survey will be first shared on a website (http://web.icu.ac.jp/IERS) and later published in an open journal which is under a Creative Commons license.

Thank you for your contribution to the development of the quality standards / pedagogical guidelines for OER use in higher education.

Sincerely,

Researchers
Insung Jung (isjung@icu.ac.jp) and Teruyoshi Sasaki (sasaki@icu.ac.jp)
Professors of Education, International Christian University
3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8585, Japan
Tel: 81-422-33-3125/3123

Saturday, October 5, 2013

Open Educational Resources as Learning Materials: Prospects and Strategies for University Libraries

Research Library Issues / No. 280  / Sept. 2012

  • Marilyn S. Billings, Scholarly Communication and Special Initiatives Librarian, University of Massachusetts Amherst 
  • Sarah C. Hutton, Head, Undergraduate Teaching and Learning Services, University of Massachusetts Amherst 
  • Jay Schafer, Director of Libraries, University of Massachusetts Amherst 
  • Charles M. Schweik, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Conservation and Center for Public Policy and Administration, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Matt Sheridan, Digital Repository Resident Librarian, University of Massachusetts Amherst
The Open Education Initiative at UMass Amherst has demonstrated there are several ways to address the concerns students and parents have as they face an average of $1,168 per year for books and supplies.

The University Libraries, in collaboration with the campus academic administration (the Provost’s
Office), faculty support groups (Center for Teaching and Faculty Development), and academic programs (the Information Technology minor), have led the effort to incentivize faculty to modify the traditional
commercial textbook model with resources that are openly available or available to students at no additional charge. Among the alternatives now in place are:
  • True open access textbooks available through the libraries’ institutional repository, ScholarWorks@ UMass Amherst, or other open textbook solutions
  • Hybrid open educational resources that utilize the learning management system to provide accessto appropriate resources (articles, e-books, streaming media) already licensed by the libraries
  • Reducing the number of “required textbooks” by supplementing one core commercial textbookwith either open access resources or resources already licensed by the libraries to reduce theoverall cost to students.
OERs are not without issues to address. Faculty need to fully understand copyright and alternatives such as Creative Commons licensing. If faculty are assigning students to use existing licensed resources, those licenses must provide adequate access for multiple users. And, important for any resources being provided by the campus or the library, the materials must be fully accessible to all students. [snip].

While assessment of student and faculty satisfaction is still under way, preliminary indications are that both groups are very satisfied with efforts to challenge the existing model of expensive commercial textbooks with a model using OERs. One-time savings to students of over $205,000 have resulted from an initial investment of $27,000—and these savings will multiply each time the course is taught. Working with faculty and commercial publishers to promote and facilitate the adoption of open educational resources and other hybrid models places the libraries in an excellent position to uphold their public land-grant mission and to gain support from campus administration, parents, and students.

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://publications.arl.org/rli280/2]

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources


Welcome to the Consortium

Our mission is expanding access to education by promoting awareness and adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER).  Over 200 colleges have joined the consortium and many more participate in our activities and use the resources posted here.  We invite you to join the Community Colleges at the OpenCourseWare Consortium.

Fall 2013 Webinar Series Starts Oct 2nd!

Libraries leading the way; open textbook large scale projects; fostering open policies; and a community college state system goes open are all in store for you at the CCCOER fall webinar series.  Please join us.

Find OER

Use the links below to find open textbooks and open courseware for community college courses:
  • Browse 750+ Open Textbooks by Subject
  • Browse 41 Highest Enrolled Courses from the Open Course Library
  • Find 150+ peer and accessibility reviews of open textbooks at College Open Textbooks
Learning with Computer Learn about OER

Attend our monthly educational outreach webinars featuring faculty who are engaged in open educational resource development and re-use.  Click on the Webinars 2012 Archives for to view the recordings.

World Globe Who is using OER?

Many colleges promote the use of OER on their campuses by providing information and networking on their websites.    If you would like your college website added, please contact us.

Share and Adopt OER

Check out the Campus Promo Kit for help in promoting the use of OER on your campus and to provide training and tutorials for faculty on best practices for adoption and sharing of OER.

Join Our Advisory Group

Participate in in our advisory group which meets monthly online to plan activities for promoting open policies and share best practices.

Source and Links Available At:

[http://oerconsortium.org/]

SPARC > Open Educational Resources Initiative


Educational materials are an important output of the research process, and SPARC believes that Open Educational Resources (OER) maximize the power of the Internet to improve teaching and learning, and increase access to education. SPARC supports the creation and sharing of open materials used in teaching, as well as new approaches to learning where people create and shape knowledge openly together, and promotes practices and policies that advance this vision.

What are Open Educational Resources (OERs)?

Open Educational Resources are teaching, learning, and research resources released under a license that permits their free use and repurposing by others.  OERs can be full courses, course materials, lesson plans, open textbooks, learning objects, videos, games, tests, software, or any other tool, material, or technique that supports access to knowledge.

Open Educational Resources are broadly considered to meet the “4Rs Framework,” meaning that users are free to:

  • Reuse:  Content can be reused in its unaltered form;
  • Revise: Content can be adapted, adjusted, modified or altered;
  • Remix: The original or revised content can be combined with other content to create something new;
  • Redistribute: Copies of the content can be shared with others in its original, revised or remixed form.

Why Open Educational Resources?

The Internet enables us to teach, learn and develop knowledge faster and on a wider scale than ever before.  Learners can find information instantly on virtually any topic, and connect with peers across the globe.  Teachers can share their knowledge with students on another continent almost as easily as in their own classroom.  And educational resources such as books can be disseminated to a worldwide audience at virtually no marginal cost.

[snip]

How Do Open Educational Resources Work?

The OER movement is comprised of four main categories:

OpenCouseWare (OCW)

[snip]

OER Publishers:

[snip]

OER Repositories

[snip]

Publicly-Funded Initiatives

[snip]

How Do We Enable Open Educational Resources?

There are three main strategies that can be used to promote Open Educational Resources:

Supporting OER adoption. OERs are available in a wide variety of subjects and course levels, yet many educators are not aware of these resources or do not know where to find them.  Students, professors, librarians, and administrators can help spread the word to other educators and advocate adoption of OER whenever appropriate.

Supporting OER development.

[snip]

Advocating effective policies.

[snip]
 
Why Should You Care About Open Educational Resources?

During the past several years, Open Educational Resources have begun to be developed across a wide range of subjects, in an increasingly diverse set of educational settings. Researchers, scholars, students, educators and librarians are being called upon to participate in an environment that is evolving quickly, and that poses new challenges and opportunities for the creation, sharing, review, and use of educational resources.

Enabling the efficient creation and widespread adoption of Open Educational Resources will play a key role in ensuring that the scholarly communication system evolves in a way that supports the needs of scholars and the academic enterprise as a whole.

Learn more about OER ?

[snip]

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://sparc.arl.org/issues/oer]

Thursday, August 8, 2013

Open Sesame: Strategies for Promoting Open Educational Resources for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)



18th June 2013, 10:33 am by Mark Travis In: Academic, Panlibus Magazine

This  is an article from the recent Panlibus Magagine (issue 28) by Gerry McKiernan, Associate Professor and Science and Technology Librarian, Iowa State University Library. This includes all the links that we weren’t able to include in the print version.

***

As defined by Wikipedia, a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) is “… an online course aiming at large-scale participation and open access via the web”.

In late autumn 2012, the New York Times declared 2012 as the “Year of the MOOC”. Earlier, the MIT Review, claimed that they were “the most important education technology in 200 years”, and in a cover story, Time, characterized MOOCs as a major factor that was “reinventing college”. The MOOC phenomenon has also been covered by The Guardian and the Times Educational Supplement, among numerous other educational and news media.

In mid-March 2013, the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, hosted a two-day conference titled “MOOCs and Libraries: Massive Opportunity or Overwhelming Challenge?“. Co-sponsored by OCLC® Research, the event included a session on Copyright, Licensing, Open Access and one on New Opportunities for Librarians: What Happens When You Go Behind the Lines in a MOOC?

Participants in the former session members discussed “the challenges for licensing and clearing copyright for materials” used in MOOCs, and explored the potential “opportunities for advancing the conversation on open access with faculty,” while members of the latter reported and speculated on the roles of libraries and librarians in the MOOC environment. Among those noted were: serving as an advocate for different resource licensing models, identifying and organizing public domain images, as well as encouraging Open Access publishing, and the use of institutional repository content, among other initiatives

Compared to discussion of copyright and licensing negotiations and fair use of proprietary content, however, consideration of Open Educational Resources and their use in MOOCs was not as extensive and implementation strategies were not discussed in detail.

To become more engaged in Massive Open Online Courses and Open Educational Resources, librarians should become more knowledgeable about each

[more]

Available At:

[http://blogs.capita-libraries.co.uk/panlibus/2013/06/18/strategies-for-promoting-open-educational-resources-for-massive-open-online-courses-moocs/]

[http://www.capita-softwareandmanagedservices.co.uk/software/Documents/libraries-panlibus28.PDF]

[http://issuu.com/panlibus/docs/libraries-panlibus28?e=6782253/3559846]

McKiernan, Gerry."Open Sesame: Strategies for Promoting Open Educational Resources for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)." Panibus Magazine 28 (Summer 2013): 10-11.

Free Webinar > Building Virtual School Programs Using OER Repositories and MOOCs > August 22 2013


Event Details

Building Virtual School Programs using OER Repositories and MOOCs
Time: August 22, 2013 from 1pm to 2pm
Location: online
Website or Map: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/…
Event Type: 1pm pacific, 2pm mountain, 3pm central, 4pm eastern
Organized By: Open Doors Group and SoftChalk

1pm pacific / 2pm mountain ,/ 3pm central /  4pm eastern

Space is limited.

Reserve your Webinar seat now at:

Blended Schools is a network of schools that have produced hundreds of online interactive lessons and full courses, and thousands of videos which are accessible for free from their BSNcloud and BSNtube repositories. In addition, to help districts and teachers deliver blended and online learning, Blended Schools has produced a series of MOOCs to help promote and build peer/support groups.

Join us for this webinar, where Mark Gensimore, Vice President for Learning and Instruction for the Blended Schools Network, will share their experiences and show you how your institution can build virtual school programs using OER repositories and MOOCs.

While Blended Schools focuses on K-12 schools, the concepts presented in this webinar regarding OERs and MOOCs will also benefit educators working in higher education and life-long learning.

Presenter:

Mark Gensimore
Vice President for Learning and Instruction
Blended Schools Network
Photo for this event listing: blended classroom CC BY SA NC Hillsborough County School District
Source and Links Available At

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

RLI No. 280 > Open Educational Resources as Learning Materials: Prospects and Strategies for University Libraries



Research Libraries Issues No. 280 

Marilyn S. Billings, Scholarly Communication and Special Initiatives Librarian, University of
Massachusetts Amherst
Sarah C. Hutton, Head, Undergraduate Teaching and Learning Services, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Jay Schafer, Director of Libraries, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Charles M. Schweik, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Conservation and Center for Public Policy and Administration, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Matt Sheridan, Digital Repository Resident Librarian, University of Massachusetts Amherst

[snip]

Conclusion

Just as the high cost of commercial research journals has motivated the academic library community to advocate for open access publishing with faculty, the high cost of commercially published college textbooks is broadening the conversation to include open educational resources.

Many of the issues are similar—the concern for quality, the realization that publishing is not “free,” the understanding that authors should rightfully expect some level of recognition and/or remuneration for their work, and the fact that faculty can change the paradigm since they are almost totally responsible for the choice of textbooks they require. And, as with open access publishing, many faculty are not aware of the magnitude of the problem or the solutions available to them.

The Open Education Initiative at UMass Amherst has demonstrated there are several ways to address the concerns students and parents have as they face an average of $1,168 per year for books and supplies.

The University Libraries, in collaboration with the campus academic administration (the Provost’s
Office), faculty support groups (Center for Teaching and Faculty Development), and academic programs (the Information Technology minor), have led the effort to incentivize faculty to modify the traditional commercial textbook model with resources that are openly available or available to students at no additional charge. Among the alternatives now in place are:

  • True open access textbooks available through the libraries’ institutional repository, ScholarWork@ UMass Amherst, or other open textbook solutions
  • Hybrid open educational resources that utilize the learning management system to provide access to appropriate resources (articles, e-books, streaming media) already licensed by the libraries
  • Reducing the number of “required textbooks” by supplementing one core commercial textbook with either open access resources or resources already licensed by the libraries to reduce the overall cost to students.

OERs are not without issues to address. Faculty need to fully understand copyright and alternatives such as Creative Commons licensing. If faculty are assigning students to use existing licensed resources, being provided by the campus or the library, the materials must be fully accessible to all students. ARL has recently published two reports, the Report of the ARL Joint Task Force on Services to Patrons with Print Disabilities and “Massive Open Online Courses [MOOCs]: Legal and Policy Issues for Research Libraries,” an ARL Issue Brief,15 that are very helpful in understanding the complexity of these issues.

While assessment of student and faculty satisfaction is still under way, preliminary indications are
that both groups are very satisfied with efforts to challenge the existing model of expensive commercial textbooks with a model using OERs. One-time savings to students of over $205,000 have resulted from an initial investment of $27,000—and these savings will multiply each time the course is taught. Working with faculty and commercial publishers to promote and facilitate the adoption of open educational resources and other hybrid models places the libraries in an excellent position to uphold their public land grant mission and to gain support from campus administration, parents, and students.

Source and Full Text Available At 

[http://publications.arl.org/rli280/2]

Monday, April 29, 2013

JISC InfoNet > TOPIC > MOOCS: Massive Open Online Courses - A Useful Collection of Articles for Those Wanting to Know More Than Just the Hype



Open courses, open content, global impact

In 2012 we saw increased interest in open courses with press coverage focusing mainly on Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). However, despite their renewed prominence they have been around for several years. Here we cover some of the background

MOOCs are generally specifically designed as an open course and are aimed at a global level. Open Educational Resources (OERs) can be used as source materials or created as part of the learning activities in open courses. On these courses people become co-producers and co-consumers of content and roles and boundaries become blurred.

Source and Posts Available At

[http://www.jiscinfonet.ac.uk/topics/moocs/]



Open Educational Resources in the Post MOOC Era


It's clear that the landscape of the open education movement is changing everyday. What we now know as MOOCs (massive open online courses) will soon be superseded by a new MOOC-massively online open curricula. This transition is logical because courses are always steps in a longer learning pathway, which we call curricula, "majors," or degrees.

The immense supply of open educational resources (OER) available, and the efforts of universities to make these materials available to millions of students and teachers around the world, creates an imperative that OER must be used. The challenge is that the supply of OER is largely unorganized and difficult to find. One response to the demand is the University of California, Irvine's (UCI) recent announcement that its entire undergraduate chemistry curriculum is available on YouTube and its OpenCourseWare website. UCI's offering consists of 15 video courses (22 hours per course) covering the entire UCI undergraduate chemistry major.

[snip].

OER and the Context of MOOCs

UCI's chemistry initiative is the latest development in the 13-year history of open education that began when MIT made its historic announcement that it would put all of its courses on an open and fully accessible OpenCourseWare website. Over the next few years many other institutions followed MIT's lead. Today there are approximately 281 universities around the world that are part of the OCW Consortium. Large-scale open "utilities" have formed, including YouTube and iTunes U, for higher educational institutions to publish OER.

Eventually, the proliferation of OER began to have a gravitational pull. Some within the learning community began to wonder how OER could be more effective in helping students, in serving minority populations, improving the teaching/learning process, increasing graduation rates, and potentially lowering the cost of higher education.

[more]

Source and Full Text Available At 

[http://elearnmag.acm.org/archive.cfm?aid=2460460]

Clarifying Confusion: Open Content, MOOCs and Online Learning


The arrival of MOOCs , especially the so-called X-MOOCs from the elite universities of the USA and the rest of the world,  have provoked conversations in traditional residential universities which simply did not take place on a broad scale before. In particular, the issues of online learning and of open content have found their way into senior academic for a, and the indabas of senior management layers of universities. Of course, neither open content nor online learning are new per se, but they had not reached mainstream conversations in most residential universities, let alone the elite ones.


Whatever else one might think of MOOCs, they are to be welcomed for making these credible and legitimate issues to discuss. However, because they have all arrived at the same time in a sense, there is some confusion about the concepts and the parameters of what each of these issues refer to. I have even heard all of them described (more than once) under the umbrella term of “open source” as in open source content, open sources courses and open source learning.

Source

[http://openuct.uct.ac.za/blog/clarifying-confusion-open-content-moocs-and-online-learning]

An OER COUP: College Teacher and Student Perceptions of Open Educational Resources



TJ Bliss, T. Jared Robinson, John Hilton, David A. Wiley

Abstract

Despite increased development and dissemination, there has been very little empirical research on Open Educational Resources (OER). Teachers and students involved in a large-scale OER initiative at eight community colleges across the United States were given a detailed questionnaire aimed at uncovering their perceptions of the cost, outcomes, uses and perceptions of quality of the OER used in their courses. Teachers and students alike reported significant cost savings and various pedagogical and learning impacts due to the implementation of OER in the classroom. In addition, most students and teachers perceived their OER to be at least equal in quality to traditional textbooks they had used in the past. Implications for further research are discussed.

Source and Full Text Available At 

[http://jime.open.ac.uk/jime/article/view/2013-04]

Thursday, April 25, 2013

ICORE: The International Council for Open Research and Open Education



ICORE promotes, supports and enhances Open Research and Open Education worldwide.

Main objectives of ICORE are the recognition, progress and application of Open Research and Open Education: ICORE wants to bridge both worlds of Open Research and Open Education. The goal is the mutual re-usage of their results and outcomes, e.g. through the usage of digital resources from Open Research in Open Education.

Join the ICORE association and strengthen our common objectives for Open Research and Open Education and for a better future of our society worldwide!

About ICORE

The following principles form the basis for fulfilling the ICORE association’s objectives:

  • ICORE aims to promote Open Research and Open Education as a fundamental social objective.
  • ICORE aims to support the design and implementation of innovative strategies, instruments and services for facilitating Open Research and Open Education such as Open Access, Open Educational Practices and Resources.
  • ICORE aims to foster co-operation among all relevant stakeholders in Open Research and Open Education such as policy makers, researchers, educators, students, learners, non-profit and commercial providers and users.
  • ICORE aims to facilitate the continuous and rapid transfer of results from Open Research and Open Education into the deployment for future research and education and for the benefits of the general public and global society.
  • ICORE aims at fostering research and development that leads to innovation when that will benefit the objectives of the association.
Source


Wednesday, April 17, 2013

SPARC-ACRL Forum June 29 at ALA Annual Conference 2013 > Understanding the Implications of Open Education: MOOCs and More


ACRL Insider header image 2

The open access movement has focused on making scholarship freely available, expanding distribution while lowering barriers for re-use. The open educational resources movement has focused on making teaching and learning materials freely accessible and openly licensed. The skyrocketing rise in the popularity of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) has put this trend squarely on the front burner, bringing openness to pedagogy in a way not previously experienced in higher education – and expanding free distribution of a university course to tens of thousands of students around the globe.

This convergence holds great promise for open education, and also raises questions on what that future might look like. A panel of experts will explore the recent developments and policy implications of open education, the rise of open resources, and the potential impacts of this trend on libraries and higher education. They will also discuss both the promise and potential pitfalls of MOOCs and OER as part of open education.

Join SPARC and ACRL for the 11th Annual Forum, which will take place on Saturday, June 29th at 3pm.

Source

[http://bit.ly/XPOrLz]

Monday, April 15, 2013

The Wild West of MOOCs > Information Today > NewsBreak

Colleagues/

Very Timely !!!

I just submitted an invited Think Piece on Open Resources and MOOCs to an major _Library Journal_ [:-)] and finalizing another invited submission for  a British library news magazine that's due by the end of this week [Ugh !][:-)]

Next Step : A  Review Article ...

Note: Suggested Open Access journals are Most Welcome !

Next Next Step > Presentations / Workshops > Will Have PPT(s) and Will Travel  ...

Next Next Next Step > A Book ...

Note: I have enough content for an Encyclopedia [:-)]

Note: Suggested Editors / Publishers Welcome !

/Gerry

Abby Clobridgen / Posted On April 15, 2013

Hardly a day goes by without a story appearing in a major new outlet about Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). While most of the headlines—including this one—reference MOOCs, the real issues are quite broad in scope, covering everything from whether higher education as we know it is on the verge of combusting, to big, bold experiments using technology to deliver education in transformative ways on a global scale. While the exact discussions seem to change on a constant basis, some of the current hot topics include proposed legislation in California, the swirl of possibilities around business models for so-called xMOOCs, and increased demand for production and availability of open textbooks

[snip]

Open Textbooks and OERs

One of the challenges of MOOCs is providing access to reading materials—books, articles, reports that all students are able to access without limitations based on local libraries or requiring students to pay for expensive textbooks. While open access (OA) articles and books solve some needs, several organizations are trying to address this issue with a different approach: by producing free textbooks and using Open Educational Resources (OERs) in more systematic ways.

OpenStax College, an initiative of Rice University and supported by many nonprofit organizations including The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, has begun to publish its own brand of open, peer-reviewed textbooks. OpenStax College books are all openly licensed with a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY), which means that anyone is free to use, share, remix, and even make commercial use of the books. Most textbooks currently offered through OpenStax College are aimed at entry-level courses (“Introduction to Sociology,” “College Physics,” “Biology”).

The Saylor Foundation is taking a different approach to accomplish the same goal of making textbooks openly and freely available. Its Open Textbook Challenge is designed to re-license existing textbooks with a CC-BY license or encourage researchers to help develop openly licensed textbooks in specific fields. To entice authors, it is offering $20,000 for accepted textbooks aligned with eligible Saylor Foundation courses in order to build up a library of reading materials for its self-paced courses.

Lumen Learning, co-founded by David Wiley, a leader in the Open Educational Resources (OER) movement, launched the “Textbook Zero” project—an initiative designed to support “institutions that want to move an entire degree program off of expensive, traditional textbooks and on to freely available OER.” Lumen Learning is currently working with Tidewater Community College to launch a pilot project in fall 2013.

As noted in the Tidewater Community College announcement about its “Textbook-Free” degree program:

For students who pursue the new ‘textbook-free’ degree, the total cost for required textbooks will be zero. Instead, the program will use high quality open textbooks and other open educational resources, known as OER, which are freely accessible, openly licensed materials useful for teaching, learning, assessment, and research. It is estimated that a TCC student who completes the degree through the textbook-free initiative might save one-third on the cost of college.

[snip]

Source And Full Text Available At 

[http://newsbreaks.infotoday.com/NewsBreaks/The-Wild-West-of-MOOCs-88994.asp]

Related

OATS: Open Access Textbooks

[http://instr.iastate.libguides.com/oats]

Friday, April 5, 2013

OATD: Open Access Theses and Dissertations

OATD aims to be the best possible resource for finding open access graduate theses and dissertations published around the world. Metadata (information about the theses) comes from over 600 colleges, universities, and research institutions. OATD currently indexes over 1.5 million theses and dissertations.

Thomas Dowling / Director of Technologies, Z. Smith Reynolds Library / Wake Forest University

Source and Link Available At

Thursday, April 4, 2013

SIIA Releases Guide on the Use of Open Educational Resources (OER) in K-12 and Postsecondary Education



Guide helps stakeholders determine the appropriate model for developing and implementing educational resources

Washington, D.C. (March 21, 2013) – The Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA), the principal trade association for the software and digital content industries, today released the “Guide on the Use of Open Educational Resources in K-12 and Postsecondary Education.” This Guide provides a framework for understanding open educational resources (OER), and it examines development and implementation costs, current business models, government and philanthropy’s role, and other considerations around the use of OER.

“SIIA expects that educational needs will be addressed moving forward by a mix of instructional materials, including OER,” said Karen Billings, vice president of SIIA’s Education Division. “SIIA and this Guide are focused on helping public officials, instructors and content providers better understand the various OER models, as well as the total costs to consider in determining the appropriate strategy for developing and implementing a particular educational resource.”

The Guide includes the following:

  • OER Definition, including full explanations of related copyright and licensing issues
  • Total Cost of Development/Ownership of instructional materials, including implications for those creating and implementing OER
  • Business/Funding Models being used to develop and support OER by content developers and aggregators, both for-profit and non-profit
  • Government Initiatives, including a sampling of key federal, state and international OER policies and grants
  • OER Frequently Asked Questions

“SIIA recognizes that content development and delivery models will continue to evolve, and encourages an environment that fosters R&D investment, rewards innovation and quality, and thus provides students and faculty with a robust choice of curricular resources and related tools and supports,” said Mark Schneiderman, SIIA’s senior director of education policy. “In making cost-benefit calculations and comparisons, it is important that public leaders and educators consider that educational resources, including OER, require not only the initial investment, but as importantly must budget for the total, long-term cost of development and use.”

The Guide was developed under the direction of the SIIA OER working group. It was authored by independent consultants Sue Collins of CollinsConsults and Peter Levy of Learning in Motion. Their knowledge, perseverance, and commitment to excellence made this document possible. The Guide is available to all under a CC-BY license and is especially crafted to inform legislators, government officials, education leaders, faculty, and content developers and aggregators.

About SIIA

The Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) is the principal trade association for the software and digital content industry. SIIA provides global services in government relations, business development, corporate education, and intellectual property protection to more than 700 leading software and information companies. The SIIA Education Division serves and represents more than 200 member companies that provide software, digital content and other technologies that address educational needs. The Division shapes and supports the industry by providing leadership, advocacy, business development opportunities and critical market information. For more information, visit www.siia.net/education.

Source and  Link To Guide Available At

[http://bit.ly/XdSySw]

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Open Educational Resources 2013


OER13 Logo

WELCOME TO OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES 2013  > OER13: Creating a Virtuous Circle > University of Nottingham

26 - 27 March 2013 Building on the strengths of OER10, OER11 and Cambridge 2012 (where OER12 and OCWC12 conferences combined), OER13 will take place at the University of Nottingham, renowned for its Open Nottingham programme which has strategically embraced the agenda of open access to teaching.

The Conference programme will consist of an engaging mix of keynotes, refereed papers and posters exploring the impact of OER on HE within the conference themes. OER13: Evidence, Experience, Expectations, the official blog of the OER13 Conference. http://oer13.wordpress.com/

Source and Links Available At

[http://www.oer13.org/?8cb5ce60]

Creative Commons Global Summit 2013 > August 21-24 2013 > Buenos Aires, Argentina


3979308854_05080583b7_z.jpg

The global community of Creative Commons will gather this year in Buenos Aires for our bi-annual Global Summit. The event, which will run for three days from 21 to 24 August, will be held at the San Martín Cultural Center and will be co-hosted by our local Creative Commons affiliates, Fundación Vía Libre and Wikimedia Argentina. This is the first time the conference will be held in a Spanish-speaking country, and the second time in Latin America.

The event will bring together Creative Commons affiliates from the around the world with the CC board, its staff, key stakeholders, local representatives and others interested in the present and future of the commons. Attendees will discuss strategies to strengthen Creative Commons and its worldwide community; learn about the latest developments in the commons movement worldwide; and showcase local and international projects that use Creative Commons licenses. Topics covered will include the implementation of open policies in areas such as government, education, culture, business, science, data and more, as well as related topics such as free software, license development, collecting societies and copyright advocacy.

The event is free for all attendees, although registration is required, and will include a Spanish-language stream to highlight the expertise of the local community, to learn about their interests, concerns and perspectives for future work.

[snip]

Summit Program - Call for Papers

The program for this years Global Summit will be developed through a collaborative planning process, with an open call for papers and a Programming Committee made up of community members.

Creative Commons has officially launched its call for papers for the 2013 Global Summit. You have until 24 May to submit a session for the main program of the Summit. Lightning talks and unconference sessions can be submitted later.

For details on how to apply, see our Call for Papers page.

Source and Links Available At

[http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Global_Summit_2013]

World Bank > Open Data Evangelist Position Description

Background

The World Bank launched its open data initiative in April, 2010, to make World Bank datasets data freely available, accessible, easy to use and re-use, and searchable. The initial focus was on popular datasets with national-level indicators on a broad range of development topics, and the flagship products are the data web site (data.worldbank.org); the World DataBank (databank.worldbank.org); and a catalog listing of all datasets that are part of the initiative (data.worldbank.org/data-catalog).

The Development Data Group (DECDG) manages the overall coordination of the Open Data and is the secretariat for an Open Data Working Group composed of representatives from all key units in the Bank involved with the project. DECDG’s Open Data team is now seeking to recruit an individual to support the coordination of the Open Data Working Group’s activities and all aspects of its communication and outreach. The successful candidate will assist with project planning for the Working Group. He or she will promote and market the open data and open development agendas with both internal and external stakeholders and audiences; ensure that the open data initiative continues to expand and generate excitement among users – for example, by suggesting areas for expansion of coverage; by ensuring that datasets are accessible using leading methods and techniques; and by ensuring that the data website (data.worldbank.org) continues to provide an appealing experience for users.

The successful candidate will work within the DECDG Open Data team, but will be expected to work closely with other units throughout the Bank.

Duties and responsibilities

  • Specific tasks, duties, and responsibilities of the successful candidate are expected to be to:
  • Support the implementation of the Open Data initiative, in consultation with other groups and stakeholders, including the management of the Open Data Working Group process.
  • Maintain, manage and monitor a master plan for the Open Data initiative, including sub-projects managed by various groups around the Bank, and interact with task team leaders to ensure smooth implementation.
  • Organize relevant meetings; provide recommendations for improvements; establish, manage and report on key performance indicators, including web metrics, etc.
  • Support the day-to-day management, operation and maintenance of the World Bank’s open data website, including monitoring dataset additions and changes.
  • Develop new ways for users to consume and experience the Bank’s datasets, acting on feedback.
  • Identify new high-value datasets (such as data relevant at local levels) for inclusion in the Open Data initiative and associated tools.
  • Write, edit and review content for use on data.worldbank.org, blogs, video, and other on-line media outlets, and for use at events (e.g. blog posts, news stories, flyers and presentations for events, tweets, newsletters, etc.)
  • Educate and inform internal and external audiences about the various tools and resources related to open data and open development; market and promote the Open Data Initiative through networking and presentation opportunities, including the use of social media.
  • Engage audiences in a dialogue around the data and its use, and encourage greater involvement of key communities such as development researchers and academics, policy-makers in client countries, and software developers.
  • Pro-actively monitor activity, and engage and contribute as appropriate, in relevant on-line discussion groups (for example, the Google group for the API, the Drupal group for developers using the World Bank Drupal modules, the discussion for Apps for Development entrants, and comments on relevant blogs – e.g. “Let’s Talk Development”).
  • Maintain an Open Data calendar of events, initiating, planning and organizing relevant internal 
  • and external events on Open Data to link ideas, sponsors, partners and data enthusiasts.
Selection Criteria
  • Master’s degree in a relevant discipline (e.g. Economics, Statistics, Communications, Geography, International Relations, International Development, Public Affairs, Journalism, Marketing, Political Science, or related subject), plus a minimum of 3 years relevant work experience; or a Bachelor's degree in a relevant discipline and 5 years of work experience.
  • Experience and proficiency working with public statistics and data management. Prior involvement in open data and open government communities is an advantage,
  • Experience in international development, including knowledge of international trends and political, social and economic issues related to development.
  • Experience with online marketing, advocacy, web analytics and search engine optimization. Expertise using social media and other digital technologies is an advantage.
  • Expertise with web development, particularly use of APIs and web development standards. Knowledge of technologies used by the World Bank (e.g. HTML, XML, PHP, Drupal, .NET) is an advantage.
  • Excellent writing and editing skills, with a strong command of English and an ability to convey complex ideas in a clear, direct, and lively style.
  • Ability to use strong interpersonal and teamwork skills to cultivate effective, productive client relationships and partnerships and generate excitement around the Open Data Initiative.
  • Ability to solve problems, with strong investigative and research skills.
  • Sensitivity to working in a multicultural environment.

Position Currently Held By Tariq Khokhar


Source

The Roles of Libraries and Information Professionals In Open Educational Resources (OER) Initiatives



By Gema Bueno-de-la-Fuente, R. John Robertson, Stuart Boon. August 2012

Executive Summary

This report contains the findings of a study carried out by the Centre for Academic Practice & Learning Enhancement (CAPLE) and Centre for Educational Technology and Interoperability Standards (CETIS), at the University of Strathclyde. The study focuses on the involvement of the Library as an organizational unit, and of individual librarians and other information science specialists, in open educational resources (OER) initiatives. This research study contributes to the current Open Educational Resources (OER) Programme [http://www.jisc.ac.uk/oer], an initiative by JISC and the HEA whose objective is to promote the creation, dissemination, access and use of OER. This programme represents a firm commitment by UK Higher Education (HE) institutions to the OER movement.

[snip]

The analysis of those survey questions regarding the involvement and roles of the library and librarians at OER initiatives shows a considerable heterogeneity of situations. Their involvement of librarians is significant: three out of four projects teams count on at least one librarian, and most of them are based on the institutional library. In half of the projects accounted for, the library is leading or a partner of the initiative. The main areas of library’s involvement are: description and classification, management, preservation, dissemination, and promotion of OER. In order to support these activities, librarians provided expertise in information science areas, especially: metadata standards, vocabularies, indexing and classification, information retrieval, information literacy, and repository technology and management. It was also found, however, that librarians needed to develop expertise in different areas, including SEO and IPR and licensing options, but mainly about e-learning and OER knowledge, technologies and standards.

[snip]

The final conclusions of this study indicate that even if the library and/or librarians are well valued by projects where they are already engaged with, the participation of the library is still not widespread, and a significant lack of awareness exists both from OER initiatives with regards to library activities and from the libraries about the resources released by OER initiatives. However, most of the objectives of content-focused OER initiatives are strongly related to library and information science activities and skills and we consider that their involvement would be of great benefit to those projects not yet engaged with them.

We found a clear need to promote the role that libraries and librarians can play in OER initiatives, highlighting the expertise and competencies which libraries and librarians can offer. This active promotion is needed to build awareness among stakeholders about libraries and librarians potential contribution to the OER movement, but also, among libraries and librarians about their key role as OER advocates within and out-with their institutions.

We suggest that a further analysis of the practices of OER initiatives regarding their strategies for storing and dissemination of content, the creation and management of OER collections, and the OER lifecycle is required to effectively promote the role of libraries and information professionals. This analysis, together with an accurate identification of objectives and needs of OER initiatives, would allow for better development of best practice guidelines and recommendations, where librarians have an important role to play.

We conclude that libraries, libraries associations, and LIS education institutions should take on the development of the skills that librarians need to better support OER initiatives, designing and offering training programs and improving syllabus.

Source and Full Text Available At 

[http://publications.cetis.ac.uk/2012/492]

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

_Open Librarian_ Google Group Launched



The _Open Librarian_  Google Group was established on April 1 2013 > No Joke [:-)] 

It is a companion to the _Open Librarian_ blog located at

 
It is intended to serve as a forum to discuss identification, organization, and promotion of  a variety of general and specific resources as a corpus that include:

* Institutional and subject repositories.
* Open Access eTheses and Dissertations
* Open Access databases
* Open Access publications and publishing
* Open Data Sets 
* Open Educational Resources
* MOOCs
* OTHER

One can subscribe at

[https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en&fromgroups#!forum/open-librarian]

IL OER Wiki



Welcome to the IL OER wiki! This wiki was set up by Nancy Graham and Jane Secker as part of our attempts to build a community of practice for sharing information literacy teaching and learning materials as open educational resources.

The site includes:

  • A list of OER initiatives
  • Information about recent and past events on this topic
  • Details about how to get involved
Source 



Information Literacy Group and Community Services Group



Aim: To support and encourage the development and sharing of information literacy teaching materials as open educational resources, primarily within the UK.

The Group’s initial activities will be to establish an online space for the Community of Practice and to organise a training event on Creative Commons for those who deliver IL teaching.

If you’d like to keep up with the work of the group and perhaps join in, please see the following resources:

CoPILOT wiki. If you are interested in contributing to the wiki, please contact Eleni Zazani and Ella Mitchell .

Discussion list – IL-OERS@jiscmail.com – if you wish to join the IL-OERS mailing list please follow this link and click on Subscribe. You will be asked to register and then you will be able to join the list.

Twitter: @CoPILOT2013

Source and Links Available At

[http://www.cilip.org.uk/get-involved/special-interest-groups/community-services/subgroups/information-literacy/pages/copilot.aspx]

Survey Report > Librarians, Information Literacy And Open Educational Resources: Report of A Survey


In April 2012 a short survey was distributed to librarians and information  professionals to explore their knowledge of and practice around the sharing of information literacy teaching materials as open educational resources (OER). This was a joint initiative by two information professionals with support from the CILIP Information Literacy Group and UNESCO. The survey received over 100 responses mainly from  practitioners in the UK, but a smaller number of international responses \ were received. This short report highlights findings from the survey  including awareness and willingness to share resources, barriers to sharing and interest librarians have in helping build a ‘community of  practice’ in this field. 


Source and Link to Full Report Available At


Monday, April 1, 2013

_Open Librarian_ Blog Launched

The _Open Librarian_ was launched on April 1 2013. It is devoted to efforts to identify, organize, and promote Open Resources as a corpus by librarians associated with academic and research libraries.

* Institutional and subject repositories.
* Open Access eTheses and Dissertations
* Open Access databases
* Open Access publications and publishing
* Open Data Sets
* Open Educational Resources
* MOOCs
* Other